Release of Bugzilla 3.6!

Today the Bugzilla Project is proud to announce the release of the next major version of Bugzilla: 3.6! Bugzilla 3.6 has a lot of exciting new features for Bugzilla users and administrators, including migration from other bug-tracking systems, a simple “Browse” interface for browsing open bugs in a system, and some usability
improvements resulting from a scientific usability study conducted on Bugzilla.

One of the most exciting new features of Bugzilla 3.6 is Extensions. These are self-contained files that you can “drop in” to a Bugzilla installation to add new features or change Bugzilla’s behavior, without modifying any existing code! Anybody can write and distribute their own Extension–Bugzilla 3.6 includes very detailed documentation on how to write and distribute Extensions, and even includes a script that will set up the framework of a new Extension for you so that you can get right to coding.

With the release of Bugzilla 3.6, the Bugzilla 3.0.x series has reached End Of Life. This means that there will be no new releases in the 3.0.x series, even if serious security issues are discovered in 3.0.x. Bugzilla 3.0.11 is the last Bugzilla 3.0.x version that will be released. We strongly recommend that any Bugzilla installation still running Bugzilla 3.0.x promptly upgrade to Bugzilla 3.6.

Download

——–

Bugzilla is available at:

http://www.bugzilla.org/download/

Release Notes & Changes

———————–

Before installing or upgrading, you should read the Release Notes for this version of Bugzilla:

3.6: http://www.bugzilla.org/releases/3.6/release-notes.html

It is particularly important to read the Release Notes if you are upgrading from one major version to another (like 3.4.x to 3.6).

To see a list of all changes between your version of Bugzilla and the current version of Bugzilla, you can use the chart at:

http://www.bugzilla.org/status/changes.html

-Max Kanat-Alexander

Release Manager, Bugzilla Project

ZCS 6.0.6 & 5.0.23 Shipped!

We are excited to announce that Zimbra Collaboration Suite versions 6.0.6 and 5.0.23 are now available. (Zimbra Desktop 2.0 Beta2 was also released today.)

6.0.6 Key Enhancements:
22008 – CardDav support (note Mac 10.6.3 only looks at first addressbook folder in alphabetical order)
10192 – Optional meeting attendance in appt schedule tab
27959 – Add to calendar link for .ics attachments
42856 – Filters for calendar invites (with ‘is replied’ or ‘is requested’ options)
16106 – Domino migration wizard now supports user address mapping
42143 & 42774 – Exchange/Groupwise migration wizard xml config for batch
43921 – ZCO now has more settings in UI that were previously just registry editable
42877 – More GAL fields

6.0.6 Notable Fixes:
44828 – Drag ‘n drop upload Zimlet support for Firefox 3.6
42010 – Compose copy and paste in IE
44557 – Briefcase public sharing now possible again
45241 – Workaround for iCal being too aggressive in trashing dist list invites
40081 – Contact ranking table no longer used in auto-complete
43428 – Calendar replies now also go to organizer not just grantee
23876 – Message read status for shared folders with manager permissions properly updated
10573 – Admin console safari & chrome officially supported
42277 – ZCO and BB desktop manager conflict
44528 – OpenLDAP upgrade to fix ldap replica sync (zimbraMailUseDirectBuffers)

Further details on PMweb-6.0, PMweb-5.0, and in Bugzilla.

As always, kick-off a backup while you read the release notes.

6.0.6 Network Edition: Release Notes & Downloads | 6.0.6 Open Source Edition: Release Notes & Downloads

5.0.23 Network Edition: Release Notes & Downloads | 5.0.23 Open Source Edition: Release Notes & Downloads

You can also subscribe to the Zimbra :: Blog for the latest news; we hope you enjoy these releases!
-The Zimbra Team

~~~
Notes:
-Posix & Samba extension users should understand this doc.
-Disclaimer extension is not compatible (new bundled altermime for global signatures).
-Large setups may be interested in optimizing the LDAP upgrade step.
-Mac Java updates to 1.5.0_19+ not recommended (43457, 43197, & 40674).
-Upgrade paths: 4.5.0 – 4.5.6 > 4.5.11 > (LDAP replica step) > 5.0.2 – 5.0.23 > 6.0.0 – 6.0.6

__________________
-Mike Morse (MCode151)

F13 Alpha release announcement

The Fedora 13 “Goddard” Alpha release is available! What’s next for the free operating system that shows off the best new technology of tomorrow? You can see the future now at:

http://fedoraproject.org/get-prerelease

What is the Alpha release?

The Alpha release contains all the features of Fedora 13 in a form that anyone can help test. This testing, guided by the Fedora QA team, helps us target and identify bugs. When these bugs are fixed, we make a Beta release available. A Beta release is code-complete, and bears a very strong resemblance to the third and final release. The final release of Fedora 13 is due in May.

We need your help to make Fedora 13 the best release yet, so please take a moment of your time to download and try out the Alpha and make sure the things that are important to you are working. If you find a bug, please report it — every bug you uncover is a chance to improve the experience for millions of Fedora users worldwide. Together, we can make Fedora a rock-solid distribution. (Read down to the end of the announcement for more information on how to help.)

Read the full article here

Fedora Ambassadors

ZCS 6.0.4 & 5.0.21 Dual Release

We are pleased to announce that the Zimbra Collaboration Suite versions 6.0.4 and 5.0.21 are now available.

Before upgrading, kick-off a backup while you read the release notes.

6.0.4 Key Enhancements:
04720 – system wide mandatory disclaimer zimbraDomainMandatoryMailSignature[Enabled/Text/HTML] (Global, per-domain is 41872.)
10317 – Advanced Search Actions (Ctrl-Shift-A or Shift-Right-Click the checkbox to select and take action on all search results, not just those displayed.)
15146 – add calendar reminders with units = days
32675 – Appointment create UI should check for resource conflicts for recurring appointments
39806 – Remove orphan share grants
39055 – Exchange Migration Wizard needs user mapping for batch import
28869 – document how to use ‘log bin’ for better MySQL backup

6.0.4 Notable Fixes:
42926 – OpenLDAP 2.4.20
42089 – MySQL 5.0.87
35459 – Cannot revoke share with Public
41213 – 6.0 breaks external pop / spop for servers not supporting UIDL
42278 – Deprecate the old mail filtering SOAP APIs RulesRequest > FilterRulesRequest
42534 – invalid value for flags: 134217728 clearArchivedFlag.pl
23238 – ZCO: forwarding an appt from internal user to internal user does not work
38520 – ZCO: headers only mode: download message when read
31607 – ZCO: missing: read receipts in outlook

5.0.21 & 6.0.4 Notable Fixes:
43220 – Jetty https unresponsiveness
43107 – Organizer loses appt if it was autosaved
42482 – Android 2.0: Email text body truncated
42748 – IMAP Search MESSAGE-ID failure if id is enclosed in <>
39011 – native formatter exception for new document rest url
42352 – Very large contact groups cause sync to fail on “out of memory exception”

5.0.21 Security Fixes (third-party CVE-2009-3555)
42422 – OpenSSL 0.9.8l
42508 & 42509 – upgrade Nginx
42793 – Replace Jetty networking core with 6.1.22’s

Further details on PMweb-6.0, PMweb-5.0, and in Bugzilla.

6.0.4 Network Edition: Release Notes & Downloads | 6.0.4 Open Source Edition: Release Notes & Downloads

5.0.21 Network Edition: Release Notes & Downloads | 5.0.21 Open Source Edition: Release Notes & Downloads

Subscribe to the blog for the latest; we hope you enjoy these releases!
-The Zimbra Team

~~~
Known issues for 6.0:
-Posix & Samba extension users should understand this doc.
-Disclaimer extension is not compatible (new bundled altermime for global signatures).
-Large setups may be interested in optimizing the LDAP upgrade step.
-Primary/Secondary family mailbox quirks.
-Apple’s custom Java updates to 1.5.0_19+ are not recommended (43457, 43197, & 40674).

Paths to getting on latest ZCS version:
6.0.x > 6.0.4
5.0.2 – 5.0.20 > 6.0.4
4.5.7 – 5.0.1 > 5.0.21 > 6.0.4
4.5.0 – 4.5.6 > 4.5.11 > 5.0.21 > 6.0.4
(LDAP replicas additional step when going 4.5 > 5.0)

Zimbra 6.0.3 Is Out & Recommended

We are pleased to announce that the Zimbra Collaboration Suite version 6.0.3 is now available.

This is primarily a security release to address the third-party SSL/TLS renegotiation ‘man in the middle’ protocol flaw (CVE-2009-3555), but we also took the opportunity to address several of your most pressing issues.

You can now upgrade 5.0.20 to 6.0.3 (previously that path was not possible with 6.0.2, and had we mentioned waiting until 6.0.4). For those choosing to remain on the 5.x series we will be releasing 5.0.21 shortly.

Security Fixes:
42422 – upgrade OpenSSL
42570 – upgrade Jetty
42508 & 42509 – upgrade Nginx

Zimbra Fixes:
42761 – Enable upgrade path from 5.0.20 to 6.0.3
42074 – Mail view scrolls to top
41920 – Duplicates returned in contact search
41753 – forwarded invitations get stuck in the queue
42012 – Jetty Acceptor1 misbehaving channels
42127 – Message showed a blank page when opened
42477 – jetty cancels server socket key in busy key workaround

Further details on PMweb & Bugzilla.

Before upgrading, kick-off a backup while you read the release notes.

6.0.3 Network Edition: Release Notes & Downloads

6.0.3 Open Source Edition: Release Notes & Downloads

~~~

Known issues:
-Posix & Samba extension users should understand this doc.
-Disclaimer extension is not compatible.
-Large setups may be interested in optimizing the LDAP upgrade step.
-Switching to RGB values for tags/folders handling of old 1-9 values caused some to be orange/color not inherited.
-Primary/Secondary family mailbox quirks.

Paths to getting on latest ZCS version:
6.0.x > 6.0.3
5.0.2 – 5.0.20 > 6.0.3 (or upcoming 5.0.21)
4.5.7 – 5.0.1 > 5.0.20 > 6.0.3
4.5.0 – 4.5.6 > 4.5.11 > 5.0.20 > 6.0.3
(LDAP replicas additional step when going 4.5.x > 5.0.x)

-The Zimbra Team

Announcing Fedora 12

I’m proud to announce the release of Fedora 12, the latest innovative Linux distribution from the Fedora Project, a global, collaborative partnership of free software community members sponsored by Red Hat.

If you can’t wait to get the distribution, simply visit: http://get.fedoraproject.org

If you want a quick tour of highlights in this release, check out: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_12_one_page_release_notes

You can also find this announcement text at: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_12_Announcement

Or read on for loads of information about the new release and all the leading edge technologies we’ve packed into it. More links are available at the end of this message, too. Enjoy!

* * *

Fedora is a leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to many users, with a new release about every six months. We bring to you the latest and greatest release of Fedora ever, Fedora 12! Join us and share the joy of Free software and the community with friends and family. We have several major new features with special focus on desktops, netbooks, virtualization and system administration.

== What’s New in Fedora 12? ==

  • Optimized performance – All software packages on 32-bit (x86_32) architecture have been compiled for i686 systems, with special optimization for the Intel Atom processors used in many netbooks, but without losing compatibility with the overwhelming majority of CPUs.
  • Smaller and faster updates – In Fedora 11, the optional yum-presto plugin, developed by Fedora contributor Jonathan Dieter, reduced update size by transmitting only the changes in the updated packages. Now, the plugin is installed by default. Also, RPMs now use XZ rather than gzip for compression, providing smaller package sizes without the memory and CPU penalties associated with bzip2. This lets us fit more software into each Fedora image, and uses less space on mirrors, making their administrators’ lives a little easier. Thanks to the Fedora infrastructure team for their excellent work in setting up the infrastructure to generate delta RPMs on the fly for all the updates.
  • NetworkManager broadband and other enhancements – NetworkManager, originally developed by Red Hat’s Dan Williams, was introduced in Fedora 7 and has become the de facto network configuration solution for distributions everywhere. Enhancements to NetworkManager make both system-wide connections and mobile broadband connections easier than ever. Bluetooth PAN support offers a simple click through process to access the Internet from your mobile phone. NetworkManager can now configure always-on and static address connections directly from the desktop. PolicyKit integration has been added so configuration management can be done via central policy where needed. IPv6 support has also been improved.
  • Next-generation (Ogg) Theora video – For several years, Theora, the open and free format not encumbered by known patents has provided a way for freedom-loving users to share video. Fedora 12 includes the new Theora 1.1, which achieves very high quality comparable to H.264, meeting the expectations of demanding users with crisp, vibrant media in both streaming and downloadable form. Thanks to the work of the Xiph.Org Foundation’s Christopher “Monty” Montgomery, sponsored by Red Hat, other Xiph developers and the contribution of Mozilla.org, Theora videos now deliver much better quality primarily via enhancements in the encoder without any change in the format, making it available to all Theora users. Using Theora video and Vorbis audio formats, Firefox 3.5 and applications using the Gstreamer multimedia framework can deliver free media on the web out of the box even better than the previous release of Fedora. Theora is being rapidly adopted by several popular websites including Wikipedia, VideoPress and DailyMotion. Fedora Project is proud to support communities of free culture and open content as part of our mission. More details at http://hacks.mozilla.org/2009/09/theora-1-1-released/
  • Graphics support improvements – Fedora 12 introduces experimental 3D support for AMD Radeon HD 2400 and later graphics cards. To try it out, install the mesa-dri-drivers-experimental package. On many cards, this support should allow desktop effects to be used. Kernel mode setting (KMS) support, which was introduced on AMD hardware in Fedora 10 and extended to Intel hardware in Fedora 11, is now extended to NVIDIA hardware as well, meaning the great majority of systems now benefit from the smooth, fully-graphical startup sequence made possible by KMS. The Fedora graphical startup sequence now works better on systems with multiple monitors. Also on multiple monitor systems, the desktop will now automatically be spread across all monitors by default, rather than having all monitors display the same output, including on NVIDIA chips (where multiple monitor spanning was not possible without manual configuration changes in Fedora 11). Systems with NVIDIA graphics chips also gain initial support for suspend and resume functionality via the default Nouveau driver. Initial support for the new DisplayPort display connector has been added for Intel graphics chips. Support for Nvidia and ATI systems is already under rapid development and will be included in the next release of Fedora. Thanks to the Red Hat Xorg team including Adam Jackson (X server), Kristian Høgsberg (Intel driver), Dave Airlie and Jerome Glisse (Radeon driver for AMD), and Ben Skeggs (Nouveau driver for NVIDIA).
  • Virtualization improvements – Not content with all the improvements in Fedora 11, we’ve kicked virtualization based on KVM up another notch in Fedora 12. There are extensive improvements in performance, management, and resource sharing, and still more security enhancements. A new library (libguestfs) and an interactive tool (guestfish) are now available for directly accessing and modifying virtual machine disk images. Richard W.M. Jones from Red Hat’s virtualization team has a list of extensive virtualization tools available and coming up for Fedora at http://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/20/fedora-virt-commands/
  • Automatic reporting of crashes and SELinux issues – Abrt, a tool to help non-power users report crashes to Bugzilla with a few mouse clicks, is now enabled by default. Abrt collects detailed information automatically and helps developers identify and resolve issues faster, improving the quality of individual upstream components and Fedora. The SELinux alert monitoring tool has also added the ability to report SELinux issues to Bugzilla quickly and easily with just a couple of clicks.
  • New Dracut initrd generation tool – Up until Fedora 11, the boot system (initial ram disk or initrd) used to boot Fedora was monolithic, very distribution specific, and didn’t provide much flexibility. This has been replaced with Dracut, an initial ram disk generation tool with an event-based framework designed to be distribution-independent. Dracut has been also adopted by OLPC which uses Fedora; OLPC modules for Dracut are available in the Fedora repository. Thanks to the Dracut team, including Harald Hoyer, Jeremy Katz, Dave Jones, and many others.
  • PackageKit plugins – PackageKit now has a plugin which can install an appropriate package when a user tries to run a command from a missing package. Another new plugin allows installation of software packages from a web browser. Thanks to Red Hat’s Richard Hughes and the PackageKit team.
  • Bluetooth on-demand – Bluetooth services are automatically started when needed and stopped 30 seconds after last device use, reducing initial startup time and resource use when Bluetooth is not in active use. Thanks to Red Hat’s Bastien Nocera.
  • Moblin graphical interface for netbooks – In additional to special compiler optimization for netbooks in this release and the continued integration of Sugar interface, the Moblin graphical interface and applications are fully integrated thanks to Peter Robinson, a Fedora Project volunteer, and others. Collaboration between the Moblin project and Fedora was accelerated since Moblin itself is largely based on Fedora. To use it, just install the Moblin Desktop Environment package group using yum or the graphical software management tools, and choose Moblin from the login manager. A Moblin Fedora Remix (installable Live CD) for Fedora 12 will also be available.
  • PulseAudio enhancements – Red Hat’s Lennart Poettering and several others have made significant improvements to the PulseAudio system. Improved mixer logic makes volume control more fine-grained and reliable. Integration with the Rygel UPnP media server means you can stream audio directly from your system to any UPnP / DLNA client, such as a Playstation 3. Hotplug support has been made more intelligent, so if you configure a device as the default output for a stream, unplug that device — causing the stream(s) to be moved to another output device — and later reattach it, the stream is moved back to the preferred device. Finally, Bluetooth audio support means pairing with any Bluetooth audio device makes it available for use through PulseAudio.
  • Lower process privileges – In order to mitigate the impact of security vulnerabilities, permissions have been hardened for many files and system directories. Also, process privileges have been lowered for a number of core components that require super user privileges. Red Hat’s Steve Grubb has developed a new library, libcap-ng, and integrated it into many core system components to improve the security of Fedora.
  • SELinux sandbox – It is now possible to confine applications’ access to the system and run them in a secure sandbox that takes advantage of the sophisticated capabilities of SELinux. Dan Walsh, SELinux developer at Red Hat, explains the details at http://danwalsh.livejournal.com/31146.html
  • Open Broadcom firmware – The openfwwf open source Broadcom firmware is included by default. This means wireless networking will be available out of the box on some Broadcom chipsets.
  • Hybrid live images – The Live images provided in this release can be directly imaged onto a USB stick using dd (or any equivalent tool) to create bootable Live USB keys. The Fedora Live USB Creator for Windows and Fedora and the livecd-tools for Fedora are still recommended for data persistence, encryption and non-destructive writes. Thanks to Jeremy Katz.
  • * Better webcam support – While Fedora 11 improved webcam support, in Fedora 12 you can expect even better video quality, especially for less expensive webcams. Red Hat’s Hans de Goede, developer of the libv4l library, has more details on his continuous upstream webcam support enhancements at http://hansdegoede.livejournal.com/6989.html.
  • Polished Desktop – The latest version of the GNOME desktop includes the lighter Gnote replacement for Tomboy as the default note application, and Empathy replaces Pidgin as the default instant messenger. The new volume control application, first seen in Fedora 11, has been improved to cover more advanced users. There are many nice tweaks from the desktop team for a polished user experience. More details at http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Desktop_Enhancements_in_Fedora_12
  • GNOME Shell preview – Fedora 12 includes an early version of GNOME Shell, which will become the default interface for GNOME 3.0 and beyond. To try it, install the gnome-shell package, and use the Desktop Effects configuration tool to enable it. It will only work correctly from the GNOME desktop environment, not others such as KDE or Xfce. This is a preview technology, and some video cards may not be supported. Thanks to Owen Taylor from Red Hat and the GNOME Shell team.
  • KDE 4.3 – The new KDE features an updated “Air” theme and fully configurable keyboard shortcuts in Plasma, improved performance and new desktop effects in the window manager, a new bug reporting tool, and a configuration tool for the LIRC infra-red remote control system.
  • Cool new stuff for developers beginning with Eclipse Galileo, which includes more plugins than ever before. Perl 6 is now included, along with PHP 5.3. For Haskell developers, the Haskell Platform now provides a standardized set of libraries and tools. But one of the biggest changes for developers is that most of the nice new features of Fedora 12, from Bluetooth to webcams, are implemented through underlying libraries, and many of the improvements will be included simply by relinking your application. Also available in this release are SystemTap 1.0 for improved instrumenting and debugging of binaries, complete with Eclipse integration, and the newest NetBeans IDE for Java development.
  • Cool new stuff for sysadmins include added functionality for clustered Samba services (including active/active configurations) over GFS2; and the ability to boot a cluster of Fedora systems from a single, shared root file system.
  • Multi-Pointer X – The update to X.Org server 1.7 introduces the X Input Extension version 2.0 (XI2), with much work contributed by Red Hat’s Peter Hutterer. This extension provides a new client API for handling input devices and also Multi-Pointer X (MPX) functionality. MPX functionality allows X to cope with many inputs of arbitrary types simultaneously, a prerequisite for (among others) multitouch-based desktops and multi-user interaction on a single screen. This is low-level work of which applications and desktop environments will incrementally take advantage in future releases. More details are available in the Release Notes and in the XI2 tag of Peter Hutterer’s blog at http://who-t.blogspot.com/search/label/xi2

A full feature list is available on the wiki at: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/12/FeatureList

OK, go get it. You know you can’t wait: http://get.fedoraproject.org

Fedora 12 release notes and guides for several languages are available at: http://docs.fedoraproject.org/

* * *

Even as we continue to provide updates with enhancements and bug fixes to improve the Fedora 12 experience, our next release, Fedora 13, is already being developed in parallel, and is open for active development now. We have an early schedule for an April 2010 release, with many new features slated.

Refer to: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/13/Schedule
and: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/13/FeatureList

Fedora Ambassadors

Fedora 12 Beta now available!

Fedora is a leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to many users, with a new release every six months. We have reached the Fedora 12 Beta, the last important development milestone of Fedora 12. Only critical bug fixes will be pushed as updates leading up to the general release of Fedora 12, scheduled to be released in mid-November. We invite you to join us and participate in making Fedora 12 a solid release by downloading, testing, and providing us your valuable feedback.

http://fedoraproject.org/get-prerelease

Of course, this is a beta release, some problems may still be lurking. Should you trip across one of them, be sure it gets fixed before release by reporting your discovery at:

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/

Thank you!

What’s New in Fedora 12?

* Optimized performance – All software packages on 32-bit (x86_32) architecture have been compiled for i686 systems with special optimization for Intel Atom processors used in many netbooks but without losing compatibility with the overwhelming majority of CPUs. There is a list of the rare CPUs which will no longer be supported.

* Smaller and faster updates – In Fedora 11, the optional yum-presto plugin, developed by Fedora contributor Jonathan Dieter, reduced update size by transmitting only the changes in the updated packages. Now, the plugin is installed by default. Also, RPMs now use XZ rather than gzip for compression, providing smaller package sizes without the memory and CPU penalties associated with bzip2. This lets us fit more software into each Fedora image, and uses less space on mirrors, making their administrators’ lives a little easier. Thanks to the Fedora infrastructure team for their work in generating delta RPMs.

* NetworkManager broadband and other enhancements – NetworkManager, originally developed by Red Hat’s Dan Williams, was introduced in Fedora 7 and has become the de facto network configuration solution for distributions everywhere. Enhancements to NetworkManager make both system-wide connections and mobile broadband connections easier than ever. Signal strength and network selection are available for choosing the best mobile broadband connection when you’re on the road. Bluetooth PAN support offers a simple click through process to access the Internet from your mobile phone. NetworkManager can now configure always-on and static address connections directly from the desktop. PolicyKit integration has been added so configuration management can be done via central policy where needed. IPv6 support has also been improved.

* Next-generation (Ogg) Theora video – For several years, Theora, the open and free format not encumbered by known patents has provided a way for freedom-loving users to share video. Fedora 12 includes the new Theora 1.1, which achieves near-H.264 quality, meeting the expectations of demanding users with crisp, vibrant media in both streaming and downloadable form. Thanks to the work of the Xiph.Org Foundation’s Christopher “Monty” Montgomery, sponsored by Red Hat, other Xiph developers, and the contribution of Mozilla.org, Firefox 3.5 can deliver free media on the web out of the box, using the Theora video and Vorbis audio formats even better than the previous release of Fedora.

* Graphics support improvements – Fedora 12 introduces experimental 3D support for AMD Radeon HD 2400 and later graphics cards. To try it out, install the mesa-dri-drivers-experimental package. On many cards, this support should allow desktop effects to be used. Kernel mode setting (KMS) support, which was introduced on AMD hardware in Fedora 10 and extended to Intel hardware in Fedora 11, is now extended to NVIDIA hardware as well, meaning the great majority of systems now benefit from the smooth, fully-graphical startup sequence made possible by KMS. The Fedora graphical startup sequence now works better on systems with multiple monitors. Also on multiple monitor systems, the desktop will now automatically be spread across all monitors by default, rather than having all monitors display the same output, including on NVIDIA chips (where multiple monitor spanning was not possible without manual configuration changes in Fedora 11). Systems with NVIDIA graphics chips also gain initial support for suspend and resume functionality via the default Nouveau driver. Initial support for the new DisplayPort display connector has been added for Intel graphics chips. Support for Nvidia and ATI systems is already under rapid development and will be included in the next release of Fedora. Thanks to the Red Hat Xorg team including Adam Jackson (X server), Kristian Høgsberg (Intel driver), Dave Airlie and Jerome Glisse (Radeon driver for AMD), and Ben Skeggs (Nouveau driver for NVIDIA).

* Virtualization improvements – Not content with all the improvements in Fedora 11, we’ve kicked virtualization based on KVM up another notch in Fedora 12. There are extensive improvements in performance, management, resource sharing, and still more security enhancements. A new library (libguestfs) and an interactive tool (guestfish) are now available for directly accessing and modifying virtual machine disk images.

* Automatic reporting of crashes and SELinux issues – Abrt, a tool to help non-power users report crashes to Bugzilla with a few mouse clicks, is now enabled by default. Abrt collects detailed information automatically and helps developers identify and resolve issues faster, improving the quality of individual upstream components and Fedora. The SELinux alert monitoring tool has also added the ability to report SELinux issues to Bugzilla quickly and easily with just a couple of clicks.

* New Dracut initrd generation tool – Up until Fedora 11, the boot system (initial ram disk or initrd) used to boot Fedora was monolithic, very distribution specific and didn’t provide much flexibility. This has been replaced with Dracut, an initial ram disk generation tool with an event-based framework designed to be distribution-independent thanks to the Dracut team including Harald Hoyer, Jeremy Katz, Dave Jones and many others. It has been also adopted by OLPC which uses Fedora; OLPC modules for Dracut are available in the Fedora repository.

* PackageKit plugins – PackageKit now has a plugin which can install an appropriate package when a user tries to run a command from a missing package. Another new plugin allows installation of software packages from a web browser. Thanks to Red Hat’s Richard Hughes and the PackageKit team.

* Bluetooth on-demand – Bluetooth services are automatically started when needed and stopped 30 seconds after last device use, reducing initial startup time and resource use when Bluetooth is not in active use. Thanks to Red Hat’s Bastien Nocera.

* Moblin graphical interface for netbooks – The Moblin graphical interface and applications are fully integrated thanks to Peter Robinson, a Fedora Project volunteer, and others. To use it, just install the Moblin Desktop Environment package group using yum or the graphical software management tools, and choose Moblin from the login manager. A F12 Moblin Fedora Remix (installable Live CD) will also be available.

* PulseAudio enhancements – Red Hat’s Lennart Poettering and several others have made significant improvements to the PulseAudio system. Improved mixer logic makes volume control more fine-grained and reliable. Integration with the Rygel UPnP media server means you can stream audio directly from your system to any UPnP / DLNA client, such as a Playstation 3. Hotplug support has been made more intelligent, so if you configure a device as the default output for a stream, unplug that device — causing the stream(s) to be moved to another output device — and later replug it, the stream is moved back to the preferred device. Finally, Bluetooth audio support means pairing with any Bluetooth audio device makes it available for use through PulseAudio.

* Lower process privileges – In order to mitigate the impact of security vulnerabilities, permissions have been hardened for many files and system directories and process privileges have been lowered for a number of core components that require super user privileges. Red Hat’s Steve Grubb has developed a new library, libcap-ng, and integrated it into many core system components to improve the security of Fedora.

* SELinux sandbox – It is now possible to confine applications’ access to the system and run them in a secure sandbox that takes advantage of the sophisticated capabilities of SELinux. Dan Walsh, SELinux developer at Red Hat, explains the details at http://danwalsh.livejournal.com/31146.html

* Open Broadcom firmware – The openfwwf open source Broadcom firmware is included by default. This means wireless networking will be available out of the box on some Broadcom chipsets.

* Hybrid live images – The Live images provided in this release can be directly imaged onto a USB stick using dd (or any equivalent tool) to create bootable Live USB keys. The Fedora Live USB Creator for Windows and the livecd-tools for Fedora are still recommended for data persistence and non-destructive writes. Thanks to Jeremy Katz.

* Better webcam support – While Fedora 11 improved webcam support, in Fedora 12 you can expect even better video quality, especially for less expensive webcams. Red Hat’s Hans de Goede, developer of the libv4l library, has more details on his continuous upstream webcam support enhancements at http://hansdegoede.livejournal.com/6989.html.

* GNOME 2.28 – The latest version of the GNOME desktop includes the lighter Gnote replacement for Tomboy as the default note application, and Empathy replaces Pidgin as the default instant messenger. The new volume control application, first seen in Fedora 11, has been improved to restore some of the popular functionality from earlier releases without making the interface too complex.

* GNOME Shell preview – Fedora 12 includes an early version of GNOME Shell, which will become the default interface for GNOME 3.0 and beyond. To try it, install the gnome-shell package, and use the Desktop Effects configuration tool to enable it. It will only work correctly from the GNOME desktop environment, not others such as KDE or Xfce. This is a preview technology, and some video cards may not be supported.

* KDE 4.3 – The new KDE features an updated “Air” theme and fully configurable keyboard shortcuts in Plasma, improved performance and new desktop effects in the window manager, a new bug reporting tool, and a configuration tool for the LIRC infra-red remote control system.

* Cool new stuff for developers beginning with Eclipse Galileo, which includes more plugins than ever before. Perl 6 is now included, along with PHP 5.3. For Haskell developers, the Haskell Platform now provides a standardized set of libraries and tools. But one of the biggest changes for developers is that most of the nice new features of Fedora 12, from Bluetooth to WebCams is implemented through underlying libraries, and many of the improvements will be included simply by relinking your application. Also available in this release are SystemTap 1.0 for improved instrumenting and debugging of binaries, complete with Eclipse integration, and the newest NetBeans IDE for Java development.

* Cool new stuff for sysadmins includes added functionality for clustered Samba services (including active/active configurations) over GFS2; and the ability to boot a cluster of Fedora systems from a single, shared root file system.

* Multi-Pointer X – The update to X.Org server 1.7 introduces the X Input Extension version 2.0 (XI2), with much work contributed by Red Hat’s Peter Hutterer. This extension provides a new client API for handling input devices and also Multi-Pointer X (MPX) functionality. MPX functionality allows X to cope with many inputs of arbitrary types simultaneously, a prerequisite for (among others) multitouch-based desktops and multi-user interaction on a single screen. This is low-level work that applications and desktop environments will incrementally take advantage of in future releases. More details are available in the Release Notes and in the XI2 tag of Peter Hutterer’s blog at http://who-t.blogspot.com/search/label/xi2

A full feature list is available on the wiki at

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/12/FeatureList

OK, go get it. You know you can’t wait.

http://fedoraproject.org/get-prerelease

Draft release notes and guides for several languages are available at

http://docs.fedoraproject.org/drafts.html

Fedora Ambassadors

Announcing Zimbra Collaboration Suite 6.0: 50+ Million Users Have Spoken

60launchWith thousands of votes from the Zimbra community submitted to our product management database, and tens of thousands of hours logged by our engineering team, we are excited to officially announce Zimbra Collaboration Suite 6.0.

ZCS 6.0 is chock full of everything you asked for – because we made sure to check off the hit list of top requests. Some of the highlights include improved delegation and share management, increased productivity with three-pane email view, read receipts, remote wipe for mobile devices, and more. Our goal was also to make ZCS 6.0 the most flexible product yet, so we’ve also made it easier than ever to integrate 3rd party software. You can learn more about the new features in 6.0 later today in a deep-dive blog post.

But that’s not the only recent milestone: Did you ever wonder what Zimbra and South Africa have in common? No it’s not our love for South African Hip Hop or Kwaito … it is that Zimbra just bested their population of 49.3 million because today, we have surpassed the 50,000,000th paid mailbox mark. Meaning if all Zimbra users made up their own country they would be the 25th most populous in the world, edging up on Italy (Pasta anyone?). It’s amazing that we were able to gain ten million paid mailboxes just six months after reaching 40 million. Those 50 million accounts are spread across over 100,000 organizations that are now using Zimbra throughout the globe. That leap can only be attributed to our wonderful collection of partners and developers who continually remind us what people need so we can deliver the best collaboration product on the market.

We’ve been lucky to have the opportunity to work with a wide range of customers – from enterprises such as Computer Sciences Corporation, Mediacom, and WebMD to new government organizations including The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Greece’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Oman’s Ministry of Health; to educational institutions like Swarthmore College, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, and Savannah College of Art and Design.

Below are images a new mash-up built around ZCS 6 platform enhancements enabling Zimlets to be core application tabs.  “Zimbra Social” keeps you on top of all your Facebook, Twitter and Digg goodness.

Zimbra Social - Facebook and Twitter

Zimbra Social - Digg and Twitter trends

Get the latest version of the Social Zimlet from the Gallery

Thanks again for all your support and feedback; hope you enjoy ZCS 6.0!
Network Edition server download | Open Source Edition server download

You can also find a bit more about what’s new in ZCS 6 on the Zimbra website.

ZCS 6.0.1 Released

The Zimbra Collaboration Suite version 6.0.1 is now available.

Notable Fixes:
40759 – Mailbox not accessible if folder is shared to a group with alises or a user with multiple zimbraMailDeliveryAddress
40737- Zmrestoreldap cannot create directory
40454 – Improved handling of data source errors
40896- Send/receive does not sync data of mounted folders
Entire change-list for this quick maintenance oriented release: PMweb 6.0.1

Before upgrading, kick-off a backup while you read the release notes.

6.0.1 Network Edition: Release Notes & Downloads
6.0.1 Open Source Edition: Release Notes & Downloads

Thanks to the early-adopters for identifying and prioritizing these issues, thereby providing a smoother upgrade for their fellow admins still on v5.

To find out what’s new in 6.0:
» Beta 1 Blog
» Beta 2 Announcement
» RC 1 & GA Feature List PDF
» Product Tracking Portal
» Sample testzimbra.com account

Subscribe to the blog for news on the latest innovations, and enjoy this release!
-The Zimbra Team
~~~
-Posix & Samba extension users should understand this doc.
-Disclaimer extension is not yet compatible.
-Large setups may be interested in optimizing the LDAP upgrade step.
-1M+ sites bug 40648 (adjust ldap_read_timeout before upgrading / fixed for 6.0.2)
-New installs go 64-bit, it’ll be supported longer. __________________
-Mike Morse (MCode151)

Ngày hội TỰ DO PHẦN MỀM – Software Freedom Day – Journée mondiale pour la Liberté des logiciels

More information to come in this page Ngày hội TỰ DO PHẦN MỀM 2009 tại Hà Nội


Ngày Hội Tự do Phần mềm (SFD) nhằm quảng bá việc sử dụng Phần mềm Tự do mã nguồn mở (FOSS) khắp thế giới. Mục đích chủ yếu của ngày SFD là nâng cao sự hiểu biết của cộng đồng người dùng về những thuận lợi sẽ được mang lại nếu ứng dụng những phần mềm tự do mã nguồn mửo có chất lượng cao trong ngành giáo dục, chính phủ, tại cơ quan, tại nhà, v.v., nói chung là ở khắp mọi nơi ! Nếu như tổ chức phi lợi nhuận Software Freedom International phối hợp sự kiện SFD ở quy mô toàn cầu, đặc biệt bằng cách gửi các dụng cụ giúp các nhóm địa phương tuyên truyền cho ngày SFD, việc tổ chức ngày SFD thực tế được giao cho các nhóm người tình nguyện đã tập hợp để tổ chức ngày SFD tại địa phương của mình một cách tự do và chủ động.

Ngày Hội Tự do Phần mềm SFD 2009 sẽ diễn ra khắp thế giới vào ngày 19 tháng 09/2009. Các bạn có thể tham khảo chương trình của Ngày SFD2009 tại Hà Nội đang được xây dựng.

Bạn có thể tham khảo chương trình của ngày SFD 2007 ở đây, và của ngày SFD 2008 ở đây.


Software Freedom Day (SFD) is a worldwide celebration of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). Our goal in this celebration is to raise public awareness of the benefits of using high quality FOSS in education, in government, at home, and in business – in short, everywhere! The non-profit company Software Freedom International provides guidance in organizing SFD, but volunteer teams around the world organize their own SFD events to impact their own to represent the LUG.

2009’s SFD event (http://www.softwarefreedomday.org/) will take place worldwide on Sat. 19th September, 2009.

The program of the SFD 2009 can be found here.


La Journée pour la Liberté des logiciels (SFD) est une célébration des logiciels libres et à source ouverte qui a lieu dans le monde entier. Le but de cette célébration est de sensibiliser le public aux avantages que peut procurer l’utilisation des logiciels libres de haute qualité dans le monde de l’éducation, au gouvernement, au travail, à domicile, etc., en bref : partout ! Une coordination globale est faite par l’association à but non lucratif Software Freedom International, mais ce sont des équipes de volontaires qui organisent localement la célébration de la Journée SFD à leur propre manière et de façons diverses.

La Journée SFD 2009 aura lieu cette année le 19 septembre 2009. Vous pouvez voir le programme en construction de la Journée SFD 2009 à Hanoï en cliquant ici.