Fedora 13 Beta announcement

The countdown is on: Fedora 13, “Goddard,” is set to launch in mid-May. Fedora is the leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to users worldwide, with a new release every six months.

But wait! What’s that? You can’t wait a whole month to try out the latest and greatest in Fedora’s leading-edge technologies? You want to be the first to see what’s new? Well, you’re in luck. The Fedora 13 Beta release is available NOW. Hop on board and take a tour of the rocking new features.

http://fedoraproject.org/get-prerelease

What is the Beta Release?

The beta release is the last important milestone of Fedora 13. Only critical bug fixes will be pushed as updates leading up to the general release of Fedora 13, scheduled to be released in the middle of May. We invite you to join us and participate in making Fedora 13 a solid release by downloading, testing, and providing your valuable feedback.

Of course, this is a beta release, some problems may still be lurking. A list of the problems we already know about is found at the Common F13 bugs page:

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Common_F13_bugs

If you find a bug that’s not found on that page, be sure it gets fixed before release by reporting your discovery at https://bugzilla.redhat.com/. Thank you!

Read the full article here: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/F13_Beta_announcement

More articles:

Fedora 13 beta released with many goodies for the enterprise

Hội Người Khuyết tật Hà Nội nhận hỗ trợ máy vi tính chạy nguồn mở

Hôm nay Hội Người Khuyết tật Hà Nội đã tổ chức giới thiệu bộ phần mềm Ubuntu 9.10 với một số đại diện các chi Hội quận huyện. Các máy tính được dùng trong buổi giới thiệu sẽ được các đại biểu mang về dùng cho công tác của chi Hội. Đây là số máy tính được các “cổ động viên” của HanoiLUG phục hồi từ số máy cũ quá hạn sử dụng của AUF, cài đặt Ubuntu để tặng cho Hội NKTHN, kèm theo với bộ sách hướng dẫn sử dụng phần mềm nguồn mở do Bộ KHCN xuất bản. Số máy này được Hội chuyển giao cho các quận huyện xa trung tâm.

Ông Vũ Mạnh Hùng, chủ tịch Hội Người Khuyết tật Hà Nội đã từng là phó GĐ trung tâm tin học của một ngân hàng quốc doanh lớn, cho rằng đưa các máy này đến những nơi có mức dịch vụ hỗ trợ thấp là một cách thử thách, đánh giá khả năng miễn nhiễm virus, tính ổn định của phần mềm Linux có được như tuyên truyền. Giao diện tiếng Việt toàn bộ và phí bản quyền bằng không của bộ phần mềm này cũng là một điều, theo ông VM.Hùng, rất đáng quan tâm để phổ biến rộng rãi trong Hội.

Trở ngại duy nhất với việc phát triển ứng dụng phần mềm nguồn mở trong Hội NKTHN là chương trình đào tạo có tài trợ cho Hội không thể tiến hành tập trung vì điều kiện đi lại khó khăn của các hội viên. Việc đào tạo phân tán tại các cơ sở quận huyện trên địa bàn thành phố hoàn toàn do các trung tâm thực hiện trên nền Windows và các trình ứng dụng tương ứng.

Nguyễn Hữu Thành – HanoiLUG

F13 Alpha release announcement

The Fedora 13 “Goddard” Alpha release is available! What’s next for the free operating system that shows off the best new technology of tomorrow? You can see the future now at:

http://fedoraproject.org/get-prerelease

What is the Alpha release?

The Alpha release contains all the features of Fedora 13 in a form that anyone can help test. This testing, guided by the Fedora QA team, helps us target and identify bugs. When these bugs are fixed, we make a Beta release available. A Beta release is code-complete, and bears a very strong resemblance to the third and final release. The final release of Fedora 13 is due in May.

We need your help to make Fedora 13 the best release yet, so please take a moment of your time to download and try out the Alpha and make sure the things that are important to you are working. If you find a bug, please report it — every bug you uncover is a chance to improve the experience for millions of Fedora users worldwide. Together, we can make Fedora a rock-solid distribution. (Read down to the end of the announcement for more information on how to help.)

Read the full article here

Fedora Ambassadors

The Top 7 Best Linux Distributions for You

There are various approaches to answering this question. The broad answer is: “any of them,” but that’s not very helpful if you’re just looking for a place to start.

The problem is, there never can be one best Linux distribution for everyone, because the needs of each user tend to be unique. Telling someone who’s looking for a good introductory distribution to try Gentoo, for instance, would be a mistake because for all its positive qualities, Gentoo is decidedly not a beginner’s distro.

All too often, Linux aficionados will tend to list the distributions they like as the best, which is fair, but if they are not aware of their audience, they could suggest something that does not meet that person’s needs. Finding a good Linux distribution is like finding a good match in an online dating service: good looks aren’t the only quality upon which to judge a Linux distro.

To help users discover the Linux distribution that’s best for them, this resource will definitively list the best candidates for the various types of Linux users to try. The use-case categories will be:

  • Best Desktop Distribution
  • Best Laptop Distribution
  • Best Enterprise Desktop
  • Best Enterprise Server
  • Best LiveCD
  • Best Security-Enhanced Distribution
  • Best Multimedia Distribution

Once you find the best Linux distribution for your needs, you can visit our Linux Migration Guides to assist you in installing and using the one you’d like to try.

Best Linux Desktop Distribution

There are a lot of Linux distributions that have the primary focus of becoming the next best desktop replacement for Windows or OS X. Of all the categories in this list, this is the most sought-after, and contentious, group of distros.

While it would be ideal to include many distributions on this list, the reality is that there really needs to be just one “best” Linux distribution. For early 2010, that distro has to be Canonical’s Ubuntu.

Ubuntu edges out its closest contenders, Fedora and openSUSE, because its development team is constantly focused on the end-user experience. Canonical and the Ubuntu community have spent a lot of time and resources on bringing ease-of-use tools to this distribution, particularly in the area of installing Ubuntu and installing applications within Ubuntu.

In addition, Ubuntu’s level of support for its desktop products is highly superior, which is important in this class of distributions since it is the most likely to contain users new to Linux. Both the official and unofficial Ubuntu documentation is robust and searchable, a big plus.

Best Linux Laptop Distribution

Laptop distributions almost fall into the same category as desktop users, but there are a number of key differences that make the criteria for evaluating a good laptop distribution important. Power management, docking tools, and wireless ease-of-use are critical to users on the go, as is having a distro that meets those needs.

Right now, the best laptop distribution is openSUSE, one of the lead contenders for the desktop honors. On the laptop, openSUSE shines with great connectivity tools, such as an easy-to-use networking toolset that not only handles WiFi connectivity, but also CDMA/cellular modem connections.

openSUSE also deals with docking stations for laptops very well, including dual-monitor management on the fly. Power management is very granular, which is great for detailing various power needs you might find yourself needing.

Best Linux Enterprise Desktop

This category is replete with great contenders as well, and it’s difficult to highlight just one. At the end of the day, though, the nod must be given to SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED).

The reason is simple: while SLED and its primary competitor Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop are nearly identical in features and support performance, SLED has the advantage of the openSUSE Build Service, a free and open service that lets applications be built and delivered to SUSE Linux and openSUSE products (as well as Red Hat and CentOS).

This is a very important differentiator in enterprise desktop development, as it means that SLED has the current advantage of application building and deployment in the enterprise arena.

Best Linux Enterprise Server

Again, in this category it really comes down to two main contenders: Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES). Given the pick for the Enterprise Desktop category, you might expect SLES to get the “best of” label here.

But, when all factors for the enterprise server are weighed, RHEL is still the king of this particular hill.

Red Hat edges out Novell with its server product, because RHEL users get a deeply mature distribution, and Red Hat’s support structure is second to none in the enterprise channels.

Best Linux LiveCD

As Linux technology improves, users can easily choose the LiveCD version of practically any of the Linux distros listed here to get the best LiveCD experience for their needs.

There is a specialized class of LiveCDs, however, that offers users utilities and tools for the specific purpose of repairing existing Linux and Windows installations. These distros are very useful to have regardless of what primary Linux distribution you like to use, because in a crisis they are invaluable to own.

In this class of distribution, KNOPPIX is hands-down the most complete and useful distro. Loaded on a CD or USB storage device, KNOPPIX will let you recover from nearly any rare Linux system crash as well as the much-less-rare Windows breakdowns.

Best Linux Security-Enhanced Distribution

Linux is inherently very secure compared to other operating systems, but there’s always room for improvement.

One of the challenges for locking down Linux is if you are not careful, you can take away too much functionality. Another challenge is that the best security-oriented Linux distro, SELinux, is historically known to be difficult to configure correctly. Still, if security out of the box is your priority, this is the best place to begin.

Another approach is the white hat method: using security and forensic tools to examine your existing installation, determine the holes, then lock your system down based on what gaps you find. If you have the time and inclination, this is a great way to do it, because this will get any existing system more secure right away.

For the white hat approach, the best distribution is BackTrack Linux, a dedicated penetration testing distro that will enable you to safely try to crack any system you are caretaking. Its toolset and strong community give it the advantage in this category.

Best Linux Multimedia Distribution

General Linux distributions have come a long way in terms of multimedia performance. Rare is the audio or video file that can’t be played on Linux. Music services such as Rhapsody and video sites like YouTube and Hulu are also standards-compliant and accessible to Linux users.

Still, for those users who are multimedia creators as well as consumers, there are Linux distributions that contain powerful tools for audio and video editing.

The best in this class is currently Ubuntu Studio. For audio, video, and graphic production, it contains a very complete set of tools, as well as format and codec support for a huge range of multimedia formats.

The applications contained in Ubuntu Studio are the same or similar to those used by major studios to create cutting edge work, so users are getting the best apps, coupled with the strong support ethos already found in the Ubuntu community.

In Linux there are as many opinions as there are lines of code. This represents one view of the best in Linux. What’s yours?

About Author:

Brian Proffitt is a Linux and Open Source expert, having worked as a member of the Linux media as well as the Linux Foundation. My off-hour activities include Habitat for Humanity, taekwondo, and being the lucky dad of three fantastic daughters. Follow me on Twitter @LinuxScribe.

Fedora 12 installation/upgrade process

The installation/upgrade process for Fedora 12 is similar to Fedora 11: http://blog.iwayvietnam.com/tuanta/2009/08/13/fedora-11-installation-process/.

Fedora 12 local repositories in iWay LAN has been also ready. See /etc/yum.repos.d/local.repo below:

# Base packages inside iWay LAN
[base-local]
name=Fedora $releasever – $basearch – Base local
baseurl=http://dev.iwayvietnam.com/mirror/f12/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0

# Update packages inside iWay LAN
[updates-local]
name=Fedora $releasever – $basearch – Updates local
baseurl=http://mirror.iwayvietnam.com:9090/yum/updates/$releasever/$basearch/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0

# Additional packages at ATRPMS.net
[atrpms]
name=Fedora Core $releasever – $basearch – ATrpms
baseurl=http://dl.atrpms.net/f$releasever-$basearch/atrpms/stable
gpgkey=http://ATrpms.net/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms
gpgcheck=1
enabled=1

Have fun!

Announcing Fedora 12

I’m proud to announce the release of Fedora 12, the latest innovative Linux distribution from the Fedora Project, a global, collaborative partnership of free software community members sponsored by Red Hat.

If you can’t wait to get the distribution, simply visit: http://get.fedoraproject.org

If you want a quick tour of highlights in this release, check out: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_12_one_page_release_notes

You can also find this announcement text at: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_12_Announcement

Or read on for loads of information about the new release and all the leading edge technologies we’ve packed into it. More links are available at the end of this message, too. Enjoy!

* * *

Fedora is a leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to many users, with a new release about every six months. We bring to you the latest and greatest release of Fedora ever, Fedora 12! Join us and share the joy of Free software and the community with friends and family. We have several major new features with special focus on desktops, netbooks, virtualization and system administration.

== What’s New in Fedora 12? ==

  • Optimized performance – All software packages on 32-bit (x86_32) architecture have been compiled for i686 systems, with special optimization for the Intel Atom processors used in many netbooks, but without losing compatibility with the overwhelming majority of CPUs.
  • Smaller and faster updates – In Fedora 11, the optional yum-presto plugin, developed by Fedora contributor Jonathan Dieter, reduced update size by transmitting only the changes in the updated packages. Now, the plugin is installed by default. Also, RPMs now use XZ rather than gzip for compression, providing smaller package sizes without the memory and CPU penalties associated with bzip2. This lets us fit more software into each Fedora image, and uses less space on mirrors, making their administrators’ lives a little easier. Thanks to the Fedora infrastructure team for their excellent work in setting up the infrastructure to generate delta RPMs on the fly for all the updates.
  • NetworkManager broadband and other enhancements – NetworkManager, originally developed by Red Hat’s Dan Williams, was introduced in Fedora 7 and has become the de facto network configuration solution for distributions everywhere. Enhancements to NetworkManager make both system-wide connections and mobile broadband connections easier than ever. Bluetooth PAN support offers a simple click through process to access the Internet from your mobile phone. NetworkManager can now configure always-on and static address connections directly from the desktop. PolicyKit integration has been added so configuration management can be done via central policy where needed. IPv6 support has also been improved.
  • Next-generation (Ogg) Theora video – For several years, Theora, the open and free format not encumbered by known patents has provided a way for freedom-loving users to share video. Fedora 12 includes the new Theora 1.1, which achieves very high quality comparable to H.264, meeting the expectations of demanding users with crisp, vibrant media in both streaming and downloadable form. Thanks to the work of the Xiph.Org Foundation’s Christopher “Monty” Montgomery, sponsored by Red Hat, other Xiph developers and the contribution of Mozilla.org, Theora videos now deliver much better quality primarily via enhancements in the encoder without any change in the format, making it available to all Theora users. Using Theora video and Vorbis audio formats, Firefox 3.5 and applications using the Gstreamer multimedia framework can deliver free media on the web out of the box even better than the previous release of Fedora. Theora is being rapidly adopted by several popular websites including Wikipedia, VideoPress and DailyMotion. Fedora Project is proud to support communities of free culture and open content as part of our mission. More details at http://hacks.mozilla.org/2009/09/theora-1-1-released/
  • Graphics support improvements – Fedora 12 introduces experimental 3D support for AMD Radeon HD 2400 and later graphics cards. To try it out, install the mesa-dri-drivers-experimental package. On many cards, this support should allow desktop effects to be used. Kernel mode setting (KMS) support, which was introduced on AMD hardware in Fedora 10 and extended to Intel hardware in Fedora 11, is now extended to NVIDIA hardware as well, meaning the great majority of systems now benefit from the smooth, fully-graphical startup sequence made possible by KMS. The Fedora graphical startup sequence now works better on systems with multiple monitors. Also on multiple monitor systems, the desktop will now automatically be spread across all monitors by default, rather than having all monitors display the same output, including on NVIDIA chips (where multiple monitor spanning was not possible without manual configuration changes in Fedora 11). Systems with NVIDIA graphics chips also gain initial support for suspend and resume functionality via the default Nouveau driver. Initial support for the new DisplayPort display connector has been added for Intel graphics chips. Support for Nvidia and ATI systems is already under rapid development and will be included in the next release of Fedora. Thanks to the Red Hat Xorg team including Adam Jackson (X server), Kristian Høgsberg (Intel driver), Dave Airlie and Jerome Glisse (Radeon driver for AMD), and Ben Skeggs (Nouveau driver for NVIDIA).
  • Virtualization improvements – Not content with all the improvements in Fedora 11, we’ve kicked virtualization based on KVM up another notch in Fedora 12. There are extensive improvements in performance, management, and resource sharing, and still more security enhancements. A new library (libguestfs) and an interactive tool (guestfish) are now available for directly accessing and modifying virtual machine disk images. Richard W.M. Jones from Red Hat’s virtualization team has a list of extensive virtualization tools available and coming up for Fedora at http://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/20/fedora-virt-commands/
  • Automatic reporting of crashes and SELinux issues – Abrt, a tool to help non-power users report crashes to Bugzilla with a few mouse clicks, is now enabled by default. Abrt collects detailed information automatically and helps developers identify and resolve issues faster, improving the quality of individual upstream components and Fedora. The SELinux alert monitoring tool has also added the ability to report SELinux issues to Bugzilla quickly and easily with just a couple of clicks.
  • New Dracut initrd generation tool – Up until Fedora 11, the boot system (initial ram disk or initrd) used to boot Fedora was monolithic, very distribution specific, and didn’t provide much flexibility. This has been replaced with Dracut, an initial ram disk generation tool with an event-based framework designed to be distribution-independent. Dracut has been also adopted by OLPC which uses Fedora; OLPC modules for Dracut are available in the Fedora repository. Thanks to the Dracut team, including Harald Hoyer, Jeremy Katz, Dave Jones, and many others.
  • PackageKit plugins – PackageKit now has a plugin which can install an appropriate package when a user tries to run a command from a missing package. Another new plugin allows installation of software packages from a web browser. Thanks to Red Hat’s Richard Hughes and the PackageKit team.
  • Bluetooth on-demand – Bluetooth services are automatically started when needed and stopped 30 seconds after last device use, reducing initial startup time and resource use when Bluetooth is not in active use. Thanks to Red Hat’s Bastien Nocera.
  • Moblin graphical interface for netbooks – In additional to special compiler optimization for netbooks in this release and the continued integration of Sugar interface, the Moblin graphical interface and applications are fully integrated thanks to Peter Robinson, a Fedora Project volunteer, and others. Collaboration between the Moblin project and Fedora was accelerated since Moblin itself is largely based on Fedora. To use it, just install the Moblin Desktop Environment package group using yum or the graphical software management tools, and choose Moblin from the login manager. A Moblin Fedora Remix (installable Live CD) for Fedora 12 will also be available.
  • PulseAudio enhancements – Red Hat’s Lennart Poettering and several others have made significant improvements to the PulseAudio system. Improved mixer logic makes volume control more fine-grained and reliable. Integration with the Rygel UPnP media server means you can stream audio directly from your system to any UPnP / DLNA client, such as a Playstation 3. Hotplug support has been made more intelligent, so if you configure a device as the default output for a stream, unplug that device — causing the stream(s) to be moved to another output device — and later reattach it, the stream is moved back to the preferred device. Finally, Bluetooth audio support means pairing with any Bluetooth audio device makes it available for use through PulseAudio.
  • Lower process privileges – In order to mitigate the impact of security vulnerabilities, permissions have been hardened for many files and system directories. Also, process privileges have been lowered for a number of core components that require super user privileges. Red Hat’s Steve Grubb has developed a new library, libcap-ng, and integrated it into many core system components to improve the security of Fedora.
  • SELinux sandbox – It is now possible to confine applications’ access to the system and run them in a secure sandbox that takes advantage of the sophisticated capabilities of SELinux. Dan Walsh, SELinux developer at Red Hat, explains the details at http://danwalsh.livejournal.com/31146.html
  • Open Broadcom firmware – The openfwwf open source Broadcom firmware is included by default. This means wireless networking will be available out of the box on some Broadcom chipsets.
  • Hybrid live images – The Live images provided in this release can be directly imaged onto a USB stick using dd (or any equivalent tool) to create bootable Live USB keys. The Fedora Live USB Creator for Windows and Fedora and the livecd-tools for Fedora are still recommended for data persistence, encryption and non-destructive writes. Thanks to Jeremy Katz.
  • * Better webcam support – While Fedora 11 improved webcam support, in Fedora 12 you can expect even better video quality, especially for less expensive webcams. Red Hat’s Hans de Goede, developer of the libv4l library, has more details on his continuous upstream webcam support enhancements at http://hansdegoede.livejournal.com/6989.html.
  • Polished Desktop – The latest version of the GNOME desktop includes the lighter Gnote replacement for Tomboy as the default note application, and Empathy replaces Pidgin as the default instant messenger. The new volume control application, first seen in Fedora 11, has been improved to cover more advanced users. There are many nice tweaks from the desktop team for a polished user experience. More details at http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Desktop_Enhancements_in_Fedora_12
  • GNOME Shell preview – Fedora 12 includes an early version of GNOME Shell, which will become the default interface for GNOME 3.0 and beyond. To try it, install the gnome-shell package, and use the Desktop Effects configuration tool to enable it. It will only work correctly from the GNOME desktop environment, not others such as KDE or Xfce. This is a preview technology, and some video cards may not be supported. Thanks to Owen Taylor from Red Hat and the GNOME Shell team.
  • KDE 4.3 – The new KDE features an updated “Air” theme and fully configurable keyboard shortcuts in Plasma, improved performance and new desktop effects in the window manager, a new bug reporting tool, and a configuration tool for the LIRC infra-red remote control system.
  • Cool new stuff for developers beginning with Eclipse Galileo, which includes more plugins than ever before. Perl 6 is now included, along with PHP 5.3. For Haskell developers, the Haskell Platform now provides a standardized set of libraries and tools. But one of the biggest changes for developers is that most of the nice new features of Fedora 12, from Bluetooth to webcams, are implemented through underlying libraries, and many of the improvements will be included simply by relinking your application. Also available in this release are SystemTap 1.0 for improved instrumenting and debugging of binaries, complete with Eclipse integration, and the newest NetBeans IDE for Java development.
  • Cool new stuff for sysadmins include added functionality for clustered Samba services (including active/active configurations) over GFS2; and the ability to boot a cluster of Fedora systems from a single, shared root file system.
  • Multi-Pointer X – The update to X.Org server 1.7 introduces the X Input Extension version 2.0 (XI2), with much work contributed by Red Hat’s Peter Hutterer. This extension provides a new client API for handling input devices and also Multi-Pointer X (MPX) functionality. MPX functionality allows X to cope with many inputs of arbitrary types simultaneously, a prerequisite for (among others) multitouch-based desktops and multi-user interaction on a single screen. This is low-level work of which applications and desktop environments will incrementally take advantage in future releases. More details are available in the Release Notes and in the XI2 tag of Peter Hutterer’s blog at http://who-t.blogspot.com/search/label/xi2

A full feature list is available on the wiki at: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/12/FeatureList

OK, go get it. You know you can’t wait: http://get.fedoraproject.org

Fedora 12 release notes and guides for several languages are available at: http://docs.fedoraproject.org/

* * *

Even as we continue to provide updates with enhancements and bug fixes to improve the Fedora 12 experience, our next release, Fedora 13, is already being developed in parallel, and is open for active development now. We have an early schedule for an April 2010 release, with many new features slated.

Refer to: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/13/Schedule
and: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/13/FeatureList

Fedora Ambassadors

Japan Linux Symposium – a point of view

Japan Linux Symposium, co-located with Linux Kernel Summit, the newest Linux Foundation event in Asia Pacific and one of the most important events of the world FLOSS community, brings together Linux/FLOSS developers, administrators, experts as well as Linux/FLOSS users and managers all over the world. The event is held to encourage collaboration among Linux/FLOSS community and support future interaction between Japan, Asian countries and the rest of the Linux/FLOSS world.

My first impression when landing off was the country. Japan has the world’s tenth-largest population, with about 128 million people, but Japan has the world’s second-largest economy by nominal GDP, also the only Asian country in the G8 (source: Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan).

The event was taken off in three days, October 21th to 23th, 2009. It brought together over 450 participations world wide, especially Linux Kernel developers who had been here before to participate Linux Kernel Summit.

The most important day was the afternoon, October 21th, when keynote sessions were taken at ANA Intercontinental Hotel, with participation of one of the most VIP in the Linux/FLOSS community, the man who had wrote the first lines of code and currently known as chief architect of Linux Kernel, Linus Torvalds. That day marked a record with about 1,000 participants.

Linus Torvalds and METhe Linus Torvalds interview taken by Jim Zemlin, Linux Foundation, came so open with a lot of interesting things. Linus Torvalds shared his first hard days until the first result, Linux Kernel 1.0 was released; then the time when the project got more and more so important contributions from few to thousands Linux Kernel developers, who themselves have created one of the biggest FLOSS communities in the world up to now. He also shared a lot about the future of Linux, FLOSS and the community.

Learning from the way Linus Torvalds and Linux Kernel developers and the community contribute to Linux and FLOSS, I felt what myself, iWay, HanoiLUG and Vietnamese FLOSS community did are quite small and we have got a lot of things to work to take themselves into FLOSS, the inevitable trend in the world. With this such world FLOSS community, it’s not difficult to understand why Linux and FLOSS have been so successful recently.

The afternoon keynote sessions were end with a round table with other VIP from FLOSS enterprises and organizations: Larry Augustin from SugarCRM; James Bottomley from Novell/SuSE; Dan Frye from IBM; Hiroyuki Kamezawa from Fujitsu; and Shinichi Yamada from NTT DATA; moderated by Nobuyori Takahashi from Nikkei BP.

The moderator asked questions about generic topics such as: why FLOSS users/organizations should work with Linux Kernel contributors, what the benefits they can get; how to remove users’ hesitations to encourage them to use Linux and FLOSS; what we can do to get Linux ready in the future of computing, etc. Invited speakers turned around to discuss about each topic, answered together all questions, brought to the conference room an exciting air with a lot of useful information for all levels of audience from experts, Linux Kernel developers to end-users to have an overview about Linux and FLOSS today as well as in the future.

The second day was impressed by afternoon sessions too. The day began with The Kernel Report by Jon Corbet from LWN.net, about generic topics such as the vitality of the Linux community; or more detailed topics such as scalability, storage, realtime computing, virtualization, hardware, etc. which are supported or should be supported by Linux Kernel itself. And it ended with the  Kernel Developer Panel in similar type as the yesterday round table with participation of well-known Linux Kernel developers: Jon Corbet from LWN.net; Andrew Morton from Google; Takashi Iwai from Novell/SuSE; Tejun Heo from Novell/SuSE; moderated by Ted Ts’o from Linux Foundation.

The presentations presented by famous speakers in three JLS days were so various, from overview to details, from Linux Kernel to various FLOSS, from development, technological issues to hot topics about community, developing community, from the trends of developing information systems for all level managers to FLOSS usages for end-users and they brought a huge interesting information. Each presentation was limited in 45 minutes, including Q&A time, taken at five separated rooms.

Conclusion:

The event impressed me so much. I have been even obsessed by questions:

Why haven’t the FLOSS community in Vietnam, especially developers who have ability to contribute to Linux Kernel, developed yet appropriate to our real abilities?!?

What should we do to contribute more to FLOSS, together with the world FLOSS community to reach to the complete meanings of freedom in software?!?

Truong Anh Tuan, writing from Japan Linux Symposium

Tokyo, October 24th, 2009

Một góc nhìn từ hội thảo Japan Linux Symposium

Hội thảo Japan Linux Symposium, tổ chức cùng Kernel Summit, là một trong các sự kiện quan trọng nhất của cộng đồng phần mềm tự do nguồn mở trên thế giới, lần đầu tiên được tổ chức tại châu Á, quy tụ các lập trình viên, quản trị viên hệ thống, các chuyên gia Linux và phần mềm tự do nguồn mở hàng đầu châu Á và trên thế giới, các nhà quản lý, người sử dụng. Hội thảo được tổ chức nhằm tăng cường, khuyến khích hợp tác phát triển, trao đổi thông tin về Linux và phần mềm tự do nguồn mở giữa Nhật Bản, các nước châu Á với cộng đồng nguồn mở trên toàn thế giới.

Ấn tượng đầu tiên khi tham dự hội thảo chính là về nước chủ nhà. Nhật Bản với dân số 128 triệu người, đứng thứ 10 thế giới, nhưng lại là nền kinh tế đứng thứ 2 thế giới tính theo GDP và hiện là thành viên duy nhất thuộc châu Á trong nhóm các nước công nghiệp phát triển G8 (theo: Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan). Đất nước mặt trời mọc hiện ra dưới cánh bay với vẻ hiện đại mà vẫn giữ được bầu không khí thoáng đãng, rộng mở. Hạ cánh xuống sân bay, đi xe buýt về trung tâm Tokyo thấy các đường phố, nhà ga, tàu điện ngầm… với vẻ hiện đại, sạch thoáng xen giữa những chùa chiền cổ kính và đặc biệt là bầu không khí ngăn nắp, kỷ luật của những người dân Nhật Bản càng thực sự bắt đầu cảm nhận được tại sao Nhật Bản, hơn 60 năm sau ngày bị vùi lấp dưới đống tro tàn của thế chiến thứ 2, lại có thể vươn mình mạnh mẽ và có mức độ phát triển như hiện tại.

Hội thảo diễn ra trong 3 ngày, 21-23 tháng 10, quy tụ hơn 450 đại biểu đến từ nhiều quốc gia trên thế giới, đặc biệt là những lập trình viên Linux Kernel, đã có mặt từ trước tham dự đại hội Kernel Summit diễn ra tại cùng địa điểm trước đó 2 ngày. Trong đó có một ngày đặc biệt quan trọng, ngày diễn ra keynote sessions, tổ chức tại khách sạn ANA Intercontinental, chiều 21/10, với sự tham gia của một trong những người nổi tiếng nhất, đóng góp nhiều nhất cho cộng đồng phần mềm tự do nguồn mở, người đã viết những dòng code đầu tiên và hiện vẫn được coi là kiến trúc sư trưởng của Linux Kernel, Linus Torvalds. Ngày này cũng đánh dấu một con số kỷ lục về số người tham dự với trên dưới 1,000 đại biểu.

Linus Torvalds and ME

Buổi phỏng vấn Linus Torvalds, được thực hiện bởi Jim Zemlin, Linux Foundation, diễn ra hết sức cởi mở và rất nhiều điều bổ ích, ý nghĩa. Linus Torvalds đã chia sẻ những ngày đầu đầy khó khăn thử thách, cho đến khi thành quả đầu tiên, nhân Linux 1.0 được tạo ra, rồi đến giai đoạn có sự tham gia của những thành viên mới, những lập trình viên nhân Linux mà tính đến thời điểm hiện tại đã đếm bằng con số hàng ngàn, với những đóng góp mới vô cùng quan trọng, đồng thời hình thành lên cộng đồng các nhà phát triển nhân Linux như hiện tại. Linus Torvalds cũng đã chia sẻ về tương lai của Linux, của phần mềm tự do nguồn mở và cả cộng đồng.

Xem cách mà Linus Torvalds, Linux Kernel developers/contributors và các cá nhân, tổ chức khác đóng góp cho Linux nói riêng và phần mềm tự do nguồn mở nói chung lại thấy những gì bản thân mình, công ty iWay mình, HanoiLUG và cộng đồng phần mềm tự do nguồn mở tại Việt Nam nói chung đã làm được quả là quá nhỏ bé, và còn rất nhiều việc chúng ta phải làm để hòa chung vào dòng chảy, vào xu hướng không thể cản nổi này của toàn xã hội. Với một cộng đồng như thế này, không khó để lý giải về những thành công mà Linux và phần mềm tự do nguồn mở đạt được trong những năm gần đây.

Keynote sessions buổi chiều kết thúc bằng một phiên thảo luận “bàn tròn”, với sự tham gia của những nhân vật không kém phần nổi tiếng, đến từ những tổ chức đóng góp và có ảnh hướng quan trọng tới phần mềm tự do nguồn mở: Larry Augustin, SugarCRM; James Bottomley, Novell/SuSE; Dan Frye, IBM; Hiroyuki Kamezawa, Fujitsu; Shinichi Yamada, NTT DATA.

Người dẫn chương trình, Nobuyori Takahashi, Nikkei BP, đặt các câu hỏi xoay quanh các chủ đề chung như tại sao nên làm việc cùng với các contributors, lợi ích đạt được; làm thế nào để dỡ bỏ những ngại ngần của người dùng, đi đến quyết định sử dụng Linux và phần mềm tự do nguồn mở; hoặc rất cụ thể như việc: ngành điện toán những năm 80s là mainframes, 90s là Unix/RISC, 2000s là PC Server, và giả sử ngành điện toán những năm 2010s là Cloud Computing, thì chúng ta chuẩn bị thế nào để Linux và phần mềm tự do nguồn mở có được mức độ phát triển tương xứng, đúng hướng, mang lại lợi thế cạnh tranh vượt trội, trở thành lựa chọn số một cho người dùng.

Các diễn giả đã thay phiên nhau bàn luận về từng chủ đề, cùng nhau trả lời, giải đáp các thắc mắc của những người tham gia diễn đàn, mang lại một bầu không khí hết sức sôi động và truyền tải một lượng thông tin rất lớn, hữu ích tới toàn thể những người tham gia hội nghị, giúp cho từ những chuyên gia, lập trình viên nhân Linux, tới những người sử dụng cuối có được một bức tranh, ở mức độ khác nhau, toàn cảnh về Linux và phần mềm tự do nguồn mở hiện tại và tương lai.

Ngày thứ hai của hội nghị ấn tượng bởi các phiên buổi chiều bắt đầu với báo cáo tình hình cộng tác phát triển Linux Kernel (The Kernel Report) trình bày bởi Jon Corbet, LWN.net, xoay quanh các chủ đề chung mang tính cộng đồng như sức sống của cộng đồng phát triển Linux Kernel, cũng như các chủ đề chuyên sâu về công nghệ như tính dễ mở rộng, định dạng phân vùng lưu trữ, tính toán theo thời gian thực, máy ảo, phần cứng… đã được và cần được hỗ trợ bởi Linux Kernel;

Và kết thúc với phiên Kernel Developer Panel, theo hình thức tương tự phiên “bàn tròn” ngày hôm trước, với sự tham gia của những Kernel developers/contributors: Jon Corbet, LWN.net; Andrew Morton, Google; Takashi Iwai, Novell/SuSE; Tejun Heo, Novell/SuSE; dẫn chương trình bởi Ted Ts’o, Linux Foundation.

Các bài trình bày diễn ra trong 3 ngày hội nghị JLS tuy ngắn ngủi, nhưng với các chủ đề rất phong phú, từ tổng quan đến chuyên sâu trong từng lĩnh vực, từ Linux Kernel đến các phần mềm tự do nguồn mở, từ vấn đề phát triển, kỹ thuật đến các chủ đề nóng về cộng đồng, phát triển cộng đồng, từ việc hỗ trợ định hướng phát triển hệ thống thông tin với các cấp lãnh đạo đến giới thiệu cho người dùng cuối, được trình bày bởi các diễn giả uy tín, mang đến một lượng thông tin khổng lồ và vô cùng lý thú. Mỗi bài trình bày được giới hạn trong khoảng 45 phút, bao gồm thời gian hỏi đáp, diễn ra đồng thời tại 5 phòng trình bày.

Thay cho lời kết: ấn tượng đọng lại từ hội nghị hết sức sâu đậm, thậm chí ám ảnh tác giả với hàng loạt câu hỏi:

Tại sao cộng đồng sử dụng và tham gia phát triển phần mềm tự do nguồn mở, đặc biệt là phát triển, đóng góp cho Linux Kernel tại Việt Nam chưa có mức độ phát triển tương xứng với tiềm năng thực sự của chúng ta?!?!

Chúng ta phải làm gì để hòa chung vào dòng chảy để đóng góp nhiều hơn nữa, cùng cộng đồng phần mềm tự do nguồn mở toàn thế giới góp phần vươn tới ý nghĩa toàn vẹn của tự do trong phần mềm?!?!

Trương Anh Tuấn, viết từ Japan Linux Symposium.

Tokyo, 24-10-2009

Fedora 12 Beta now available!

Fedora is a leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to many users, with a new release every six months. We have reached the Fedora 12 Beta, the last important development milestone of Fedora 12. Only critical bug fixes will be pushed as updates leading up to the general release of Fedora 12, scheduled to be released in mid-November. We invite you to join us and participate in making Fedora 12 a solid release by downloading, testing, and providing us your valuable feedback.

http://fedoraproject.org/get-prerelease

Of course, this is a beta release, some problems may still be lurking. Should you trip across one of them, be sure it gets fixed before release by reporting your discovery at:

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/

Thank you!

What’s New in Fedora 12?

* Optimized performance – All software packages on 32-bit (x86_32) architecture have been compiled for i686 systems with special optimization for Intel Atom processors used in many netbooks but without losing compatibility with the overwhelming majority of CPUs. There is a list of the rare CPUs which will no longer be supported.

* Smaller and faster updates – In Fedora 11, the optional yum-presto plugin, developed by Fedora contributor Jonathan Dieter, reduced update size by transmitting only the changes in the updated packages. Now, the plugin is installed by default. Also, RPMs now use XZ rather than gzip for compression, providing smaller package sizes without the memory and CPU penalties associated with bzip2. This lets us fit more software into each Fedora image, and uses less space on mirrors, making their administrators’ lives a little easier. Thanks to the Fedora infrastructure team for their work in generating delta RPMs.

* NetworkManager broadband and other enhancements – NetworkManager, originally developed by Red Hat’s Dan Williams, was introduced in Fedora 7 and has become the de facto network configuration solution for distributions everywhere. Enhancements to NetworkManager make both system-wide connections and mobile broadband connections easier than ever. Signal strength and network selection are available for choosing the best mobile broadband connection when you’re on the road. Bluetooth PAN support offers a simple click through process to access the Internet from your mobile phone. NetworkManager can now configure always-on and static address connections directly from the desktop. PolicyKit integration has been added so configuration management can be done via central policy where needed. IPv6 support has also been improved.

* Next-generation (Ogg) Theora video – For several years, Theora, the open and free format not encumbered by known patents has provided a way for freedom-loving users to share video. Fedora 12 includes the new Theora 1.1, which achieves near-H.264 quality, meeting the expectations of demanding users with crisp, vibrant media in both streaming and downloadable form. Thanks to the work of the Xiph.Org Foundation’s Christopher “Monty” Montgomery, sponsored by Red Hat, other Xiph developers, and the contribution of Mozilla.org, Firefox 3.5 can deliver free media on the web out of the box, using the Theora video and Vorbis audio formats even better than the previous release of Fedora.

* Graphics support improvements – Fedora 12 introduces experimental 3D support for AMD Radeon HD 2400 and later graphics cards. To try it out, install the mesa-dri-drivers-experimental package. On many cards, this support should allow desktop effects to be used. Kernel mode setting (KMS) support, which was introduced on AMD hardware in Fedora 10 and extended to Intel hardware in Fedora 11, is now extended to NVIDIA hardware as well, meaning the great majority of systems now benefit from the smooth, fully-graphical startup sequence made possible by KMS. The Fedora graphical startup sequence now works better on systems with multiple monitors. Also on multiple monitor systems, the desktop will now automatically be spread across all monitors by default, rather than having all monitors display the same output, including on NVIDIA chips (where multiple monitor spanning was not possible without manual configuration changes in Fedora 11). Systems with NVIDIA graphics chips also gain initial support for suspend and resume functionality via the default Nouveau driver. Initial support for the new DisplayPort display connector has been added for Intel graphics chips. Support for Nvidia and ATI systems is already under rapid development and will be included in the next release of Fedora. Thanks to the Red Hat Xorg team including Adam Jackson (X server), Kristian Høgsberg (Intel driver), Dave Airlie and Jerome Glisse (Radeon driver for AMD), and Ben Skeggs (Nouveau driver for NVIDIA).

* Virtualization improvements – Not content with all the improvements in Fedora 11, we’ve kicked virtualization based on KVM up another notch in Fedora 12. There are extensive improvements in performance, management, resource sharing, and still more security enhancements. A new library (libguestfs) and an interactive tool (guestfish) are now available for directly accessing and modifying virtual machine disk images.

* Automatic reporting of crashes and SELinux issues – Abrt, a tool to help non-power users report crashes to Bugzilla with a few mouse clicks, is now enabled by default. Abrt collects detailed information automatically and helps developers identify and resolve issues faster, improving the quality of individual upstream components and Fedora. The SELinux alert monitoring tool has also added the ability to report SELinux issues to Bugzilla quickly and easily with just a couple of clicks.

* New Dracut initrd generation tool – Up until Fedora 11, the boot system (initial ram disk or initrd) used to boot Fedora was monolithic, very distribution specific and didn’t provide much flexibility. This has been replaced with Dracut, an initial ram disk generation tool with an event-based framework designed to be distribution-independent thanks to the Dracut team including Harald Hoyer, Jeremy Katz, Dave Jones and many others. It has been also adopted by OLPC which uses Fedora; OLPC modules for Dracut are available in the Fedora repository.

* PackageKit plugins – PackageKit now has a plugin which can install an appropriate package when a user tries to run a command from a missing package. Another new plugin allows installation of software packages from a web browser. Thanks to Red Hat’s Richard Hughes and the PackageKit team.

* Bluetooth on-demand – Bluetooth services are automatically started when needed and stopped 30 seconds after last device use, reducing initial startup time and resource use when Bluetooth is not in active use. Thanks to Red Hat’s Bastien Nocera.

* Moblin graphical interface for netbooks – The Moblin graphical interface and applications are fully integrated thanks to Peter Robinson, a Fedora Project volunteer, and others. To use it, just install the Moblin Desktop Environment package group using yum or the graphical software management tools, and choose Moblin from the login manager. A F12 Moblin Fedora Remix (installable Live CD) will also be available.

* PulseAudio enhancements – Red Hat’s Lennart Poettering and several others have made significant improvements to the PulseAudio system. Improved mixer logic makes volume control more fine-grained and reliable. Integration with the Rygel UPnP media server means you can stream audio directly from your system to any UPnP / DLNA client, such as a Playstation 3. Hotplug support has been made more intelligent, so if you configure a device as the default output for a stream, unplug that device — causing the stream(s) to be moved to another output device — and later replug it, the stream is moved back to the preferred device. Finally, Bluetooth audio support means pairing with any Bluetooth audio device makes it available for use through PulseAudio.

* Lower process privileges – In order to mitigate the impact of security vulnerabilities, permissions have been hardened for many files and system directories and process privileges have been lowered for a number of core components that require super user privileges. Red Hat’s Steve Grubb has developed a new library, libcap-ng, and integrated it into many core system components to improve the security of Fedora.

* SELinux sandbox – It is now possible to confine applications’ access to the system and run them in a secure sandbox that takes advantage of the sophisticated capabilities of SELinux. Dan Walsh, SELinux developer at Red Hat, explains the details at http://danwalsh.livejournal.com/31146.html

* Open Broadcom firmware – The openfwwf open source Broadcom firmware is included by default. This means wireless networking will be available out of the box on some Broadcom chipsets.

* Hybrid live images – The Live images provided in this release can be directly imaged onto a USB stick using dd (or any equivalent tool) to create bootable Live USB keys. The Fedora Live USB Creator for Windows and the livecd-tools for Fedora are still recommended for data persistence and non-destructive writes. Thanks to Jeremy Katz.

* Better webcam support – While Fedora 11 improved webcam support, in Fedora 12 you can expect even better video quality, especially for less expensive webcams. Red Hat’s Hans de Goede, developer of the libv4l library, has more details on his continuous upstream webcam support enhancements at http://hansdegoede.livejournal.com/6989.html.

* GNOME 2.28 – The latest version of the GNOME desktop includes the lighter Gnote replacement for Tomboy as the default note application, and Empathy replaces Pidgin as the default instant messenger. The new volume control application, first seen in Fedora 11, has been improved to restore some of the popular functionality from earlier releases without making the interface too complex.

* GNOME Shell preview – Fedora 12 includes an early version of GNOME Shell, which will become the default interface for GNOME 3.0 and beyond. To try it, install the gnome-shell package, and use the Desktop Effects configuration tool to enable it. It will only work correctly from the GNOME desktop environment, not others such as KDE or Xfce. This is a preview technology, and some video cards may not be supported.

* KDE 4.3 – The new KDE features an updated “Air” theme and fully configurable keyboard shortcuts in Plasma, improved performance and new desktop effects in the window manager, a new bug reporting tool, and a configuration tool for the LIRC infra-red remote control system.

* Cool new stuff for developers beginning with Eclipse Galileo, which includes more plugins than ever before. Perl 6 is now included, along with PHP 5.3. For Haskell developers, the Haskell Platform now provides a standardized set of libraries and tools. But one of the biggest changes for developers is that most of the nice new features of Fedora 12, from Bluetooth to WebCams is implemented through underlying libraries, and many of the improvements will be included simply by relinking your application. Also available in this release are SystemTap 1.0 for improved instrumenting and debugging of binaries, complete with Eclipse integration, and the newest NetBeans IDE for Java development.

* Cool new stuff for sysadmins includes added functionality for clustered Samba services (including active/active configurations) over GFS2; and the ability to boot a cluster of Fedora systems from a single, shared root file system.

* Multi-Pointer X – The update to X.Org server 1.7 introduces the X Input Extension version 2.0 (XI2), with much work contributed by Red Hat’s Peter Hutterer. This extension provides a new client API for handling input devices and also Multi-Pointer X (MPX) functionality. MPX functionality allows X to cope with many inputs of arbitrary types simultaneously, a prerequisite for (among others) multitouch-based desktops and multi-user interaction on a single screen. This is low-level work that applications and desktop environments will incrementally take advantage of in future releases. More details are available in the Release Notes and in the XI2 tag of Peter Hutterer’s blog at http://who-t.blogspot.com/search/label/xi2

A full feature list is available on the wiki at

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/12/FeatureList

OK, go get it. You know you can’t wait.

http://fedoraproject.org/get-prerelease

Draft release notes and guides for several languages are available at

http://docs.fedoraproject.org/drafts.html

Fedora Ambassadors

Install Chrome on Fedora Linux

You can install Chrome using the YUM package manager.

You have to first add a new repository file to the /etc/yum.repos.d directory, following steps:

  1. Open your favorite editor and enter the su command to gain root access.
  2. Create the /etc/yum.repos.d/chromium.repo file.
  3. Add the following contents to the file:
    [chromium]
    name=Chromium Test Packages
    baseurl=http://spot.fedorapeople.org/chromium/F$releasever/
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=0
  4. Save the file.

Once yum has updated you are ready to install Chromium. Issue the following command:
yum install chromium
and answer ‘Y’ to install.

After the installation is complete you are ready to run Chromium. You will find Chromium listed in the Internet sub-menu of the Applications menu.